Using a Python with high pH water

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Rocksor replied the topic: Using a Python with high pH water

UNC-CH wrote: My water company answered my e-mail with the numbers for GH and KH.

GH is around 38 mg/l.
KH is around 46 mg/l.

I take them at their word but I'd still like to do my own test. Still, if these numbers are correct would that mean it would be safe to use the peat pellets (to lower the ph)? ... Since the KH isn't too low.


You have to divide those numbers by 17.8 to get degrees reading, with GH being 2.1 degrees and KH being 2.5 degrees. Do not add the peat without mixing the water beforehand since the amount of peat can drop your buffering capacity to 0 degrees, which means that the ammonia from the fish can change your ph easily if you do not monitor everyday. The last thing that you want is to lose your cycle becase your ph dropped below 6.5.

On the flip side, you could easily breed South American fishes or use peat to keep those from highly acidic waters if you wanted to (I'm thinking of fish that thrive in a water of PH 3.0). What this also means is that it maybe more difficult for you to breed fish from hard water like CA and Lake Malawi without adding minerals.

In short, don't mess with the chemistry of your water, it's pretty good for South American fish.


Here's a link to check you your ppm (mg/l) rates

faq.thekrib.com/begin-chem.html
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Lammergeier replied the topic: Using a Python with high pH water

KH of around 46mg/L is equivalent to ~46ppm, which would give it a hardness of only ~2.6 (17.9ppm = 1 degree of hardness).

Your general hardness would only be 2.

I'd definitely call that as being too low to use peat UNC.
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UNC-CH replied the topic: Using a Python with high pH water

Ok - thanks. So my water is very soft. I was misreading a chart that said the number for GH was medium hard. Or the chart is wrong.

Hardness Level dGH mg/l ppm
Very Soft 0 - 4° dGH 0 mg/l 0 - 60 ppm
Soft 4 - 8° dGH 1 - 20 mg/l 60 - 120 ppm
Medium Hard 8-12° dGH 20 - 50 mg/l 120 - 180 ppm
Fairly Hard 12-18° dGH 50 - 120 mg/l 180 - 240 ppm
Hard 18-30° dGH 120 - 175 mg/l 240 - 500 ppm
Very Hard >30° dGH >175mg/l >500 ppm

freshaquarium.about.com/od/watercare/a/Water_Hardness_Levels.htm
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Lammergeier replied the topic: Using a Python with high pH water

It says it here:
"Very soft 0 - 4° dGH 0 mg/l 0 - 60 ppm" :)

ppm and mg/L are close enough in value that you can substitute one for the other, so 38mg/L = 38ppm and so on. They're not *exactly* the same but it's really close.


For what it's worth, your water is as soft as mine. The only difference is that the pH here is ~7 out of the tap.

Edit: Lol, I misread it too... what the, that's very confusing and not accurate at all.

I know this is wikipedia but it's a much better chart: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_water#Hard.2Fsoft_classification you can see that ppm and mg/L have the same value.
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